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how hard to remove and install headset crown race?
 

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April
Joined: 13 Dec 2003
Posts: 5005
Location: Westchester/NYC

7/7/12 7:37 PM

how hard to remove and install headset crown race?

Sometimes I didn't think things through...

So I got a new suspension fork for my dualie. And since I didn't want to chance the new fork, (needed the steerer cut anyway) I gave it to a shop to swap the headset crown race from the old fork to the new. When I went to pick it up, the shop monkey asked "do you want the old fork back?"

Mmmm... the forks on my hard tail keep losing air... "yes!"

Except the "spare" fork just got the crown race taken off!

I had to do the same swapping again if I want to use this fork to replace the older one that's losing air. And the hard tail is worth, maybe a couple hundred buck, if at all? I only use it about 5 times a year, at most.

I've looked at the Park instruction for headset removal and installation, looks a bit involved (specialized tools)...

How hard is it to take the one off and put it on a different fork? We're talking about bike/fork that isn't worth a whole lot so risk of demage is really not a big issue. If it has a reasonable chance of success, I'm willing to go for it.

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Nick Payne
Joined: 10 Jan 2004
Posts: 1930
Location: Canberra, Australia

7/7/12 8:36 PM

Why not just get an additional crown race for the second fork. I've done that for one of my bikes where I sometimes swap forks. That bike has a Chris King headset, and CK sell additional crown races separately.

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April
Joined: 13 Dec 2003
Posts: 5005
Location: Westchester/NYC

7/7/12 8:53 PM

but I have only 2 bikes, and really only 2 good forks. (the one on the hard trail keep losing air in matter of couple days)

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dddd
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 2564
Location: NorCal

7/7/12 9:05 PM

Getting the old fork off is a couple-minute job, so then it's a matter of removing the old crown race and pressing it onto the "new" fork.

While I do this at home several times per year, it is not the same each time.

Sometimes the "press fit" is tight, which can make the crown race difficult to "chisel" off, using a screwdriver as a drift punch.
And sometimes there isn't room atop the crown to get the screwdriver pointed in the right direction.
And sometimes the race takes a lot of force to press back on fully.

So, the job may be easy, but if you hit a snag then it's best to let the shop, with their proper tools, take over.

If you attempt to do this at home, wear eye protection, maybe gloves, and try not to damage the crown race by hitting it on with whatever is handy. A piece of pipe might work, or even an adjustable wrench as a striking anvil can work to spread the load and prevent damage.

Usually a shop will at least slap on the crown race for free, at least around here.

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April
Joined: 13 Dec 2003
Posts: 5005
Location: Westchester/NYC

7/7/12 9:14 PM


quote:
Usually a shop will at least slap on the crown race for free, at least around here.

This is New York. Nothing is free. (even though I'm actually outside of New York city proper, it's still New Yorkers living and working here)

This is quite a contrast compare to Bay Area, where I got stuff installed for free.

Also riders here (on $5K bikes) don't know how to fix a flat. You got the idea...

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Nick Payne
Joined: 10 Jan 2004
Posts: 1930
Location: Canberra, Australia

7/8/12 12:59 AM

Crown race doesn't cost much - the price of a few coffees.

As an alternative, some FSA headsets have a split crown race, which can be installed and removed by hand without any tools. When the fork is fitted to the frame, the taper of the lower bearing compresses the crown race in place. I've had a couple of these headsets in use for over a decade with zero problems.

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April
Joined: 13 Dec 2003
Posts: 5005
Location: Westchester/NYC

7/8/12 8:19 AM


quote:
As an alternative, some FSA headsets have a split crown race, which can be installed and removed by hand without any tools.

Interesting idea. I'll take a look.

Since I'll be tossing the old fork into the landfill anyway, it won't hurt use it as a experiment in getting the crown race off. That might even give me an idea on how easy or hard the whole project is.

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Dave B
Joined: 10 Jan 2004
Posts: 4242
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

7/8/12 9:31 AM

Good Recommendation


quote:
some FSA headsets have a split crown race, which can be installed and removed by hand without any tools.

I've got one of these FSA headsets (Orbit X) on one bike and the crown race does indeed slip on and off by hand. This is particularly nice on a carbon steerer (not your problem) since you don't ever have to pound on it.

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April
Joined: 13 Dec 2003
Posts: 5005
Location: Westchester/NYC

7/8/12 9:57 AM

A quick googling seems to indicate FSA stopped doing that lately...

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Evan Marks
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 1652
Location: NYC

7/8/12 10:09 AM


quote:
Usually a shop will at least slap on the crown race for free, at least around here.

Even in NYC. My LBS (Pedal Pusher, 2nd @ 68th) has done this for me several times. Of course, I've given him business for >10 years. And I bribe him with coffee from the local barista.

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April
Joined: 13 Dec 2003
Posts: 5005
Location: Westchester/NYC

7/8/12 11:35 AM


quote:
Of course, I've given him business for >10 years. And I bribe him with coffee from the local barista.

Aside from the time I lived in Bay area (and not working much of that time), I don't think I've given much business to bike shops in the 20 years of riding. So the "build a relationship with a trusted shop" is a little difficult to carry out when there isn't much "work" needed to be done by the shop in the first place. :-(

It's mostly NOT about money. Most bike shops open when I'm at work and closes when I got home. And unless it's raining, I'm out riding on most Saturdays! Keep in mind if I have the shop to do something, I need to go there twice: once to drop it off and once more to pick it up. A lot of the time, it's just faster to do it myself, especially on a Friday evening so it's ready for Saturday's ride!

The other problem is, given the irregularity of my visiting any shop, I found only problems rather than solutions half of the time! Too many times the bike came back with something not quite done right. In fixing those minor issues, I developed a reluctance to go to bike shops, especially on jobs I have the tools to do myself. My current situation doesn't help either. Any visit to bike shops will be out of my way, by car!

I also enjoy fiddling on bikes, which is simpler than cars yet complex enough to be engaging. Though that's really irrelevant in this case. Banging a crown race into a fork isn't terribly complex. Just something that needs to be done, except I don't have a shop I can just drop by and get it done with a smile because I'm known there...

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dddd
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 2564
Location: NorCal

7/8/12 3:54 PM

Your old fork isn't a SID fork, is it?

I've got a good SID fork with a broken dropout, so I need the lower part only. I'm checking into whether any old Judy fork might have the same lowers.

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April
Joined: 13 Dec 2003
Posts: 5005
Location: Westchester/NYC

7/8/12 4:45 PM

The one going on the old bike is a SID. The one coming off "might" be a Judy...

(both are in the apartment in NYC, I'll be there Tuesday. Do you know if RS didn't changed the geometry from year to year?)

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 2873
Location: Nashua, NH

7/8/12 5:24 PM

The fork offset is probably the same...

...but the amount of travel may be different, which would change the front end geometry somewhat (raising or lowering the head tube with an attendant change in head angle). It's also possible the the Judy could have a 1" steerer, depending on how old it is.

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dddd
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 2564
Location: NorCal

7/8/12 5:38 PM

There were a few different castings for the lowers over the years.

I think that the later ones are distinguished only by being made in one piece, like the one shown.

Mine looks like this:

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April
Joined: 13 Dec 2003
Posts: 5005
Location: Westchester/NYC

7/8/12 5:58 PM

It's got a 1 1/8 steerer alright (I switch stems between the 2 bikes all the time).

But the stension size could be wrong though. The SID that's going on the old bike is 30mm, The one being replaced is older so at most 30mm. I have to look.

First, let me find out what model it is. It's been so long since I had that bike and so many changes and upgrades I can't remember what it's got...

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 2873
Location: Nashua, NH

7/9/12 4:30 AM

The stantion size doesn't matter...

...since it doesn't affect the way the fork fits the bike.

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dddd
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 2564
Location: NorCal

7/9/12 2:17 PM

The (broken-dropout) one shown is only 28mm stanchions, it's the pre-2006(?) model, probably from ~2001 or so.

I think all the forks in question are 1-1/8" , but doesn't matter to me since I'm keeping my whole fork, minus the lowers when I find a donor.

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April
Joined: 13 Dec 2003
Posts: 5005
Location: Westchester/NYC

7/11/12 8:20 AM

Old fork is a Judy.

Putting the SID next to the Judy, I noticed the SID is longer by... say 'bout an inch!

How much would that affect handling? (tight turns and climbing?)

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dddd
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 2564
Location: NorCal

7/11/12 2:11 PM

You'll get used to the difference within a couple of rides.

I wouldn't expect the SID to sag any more than a coil-spring Judy though.

Or did you say the Judy was air? Which version? Picture?

Likely your Judy is 80mm travel and the SID is 100mm.
The air pressure will adjust the height to a degree.

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April
Joined: 13 Dec 2003
Posts: 5005
Location: Westchester/NYC

7/11/12 2:40 PM

send me you e-mail and I'll e-mail the pix to you.
[/quote]

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