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Gravel bike?
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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17307
Location: Portland, OR

4/15/19 4:21 PM

"I'm perfectly fine with 2x mechanical"

I am in this camp as well. The Lynskey is 11-36 with 28/42 rings. To my mind, I have the 42 top instead of a 38. And a 28 Granny for my sad old ars to mow up most things.

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dan emery
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 6228
Location: Maine

4/15/19 5:02 PM

Front derailleur unnecessary

But you pays your money and makes your choices.

Used the bike for commuting and grocery shopping today with the Bontrager shopper pannier. On off in 5 seconds. Perfect.

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 4419
Location: Nashua, NH

4/16/19 12:12 PM

I guess we'll have to agree to disagree on 1x vs. 2x. I really like having the closer gearing spacing that I get with a 2x, even on gravel and off-road.

Options are good!

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17307
Location: Portland, OR

4/16/19 12:25 PM

"Options are good!"

Yeah, we get to have the conversion. With off the peg parts too.

Some of us here cobbled 30/46 cranks 25 years or more back.

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dan emery
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 6228
Location: Maine

4/16/19 3:41 PM

Options good

Yeah itís just personal preference, like many things. Iíve already ridden the 1x11 on the type of riding I will mostly do on this bike, short steep dirt hills, and around town commuting, and love it. I like the simplicity of no front shifts, I actually like the gaps as I am often making big shifts in big terrain transitions, and donít care about going fast on the flats (plus I doubt it slows me down much anyway).

I have ridden doubles and triples for years and have no problems executing the shifting, but why do it if I donít need to. Iíve ridden everything from Mt Washington 12x to D2R2 4x to the Death Ride 3x. I have ridden the Rockpile many times with a road bike with a Suntour Microdrive 42/32/20 which I have used with a 11-23 through 12-29, and the bike I have used for D2R2 has 46/30 with 12-32. So if nothing else I am aware of the options:)

I donít think my legs are so finely tuned that I can only ride 89-91 rpm. :)

Iím not suggesting I am right and anyone else is wrong, but I think this setup will be great for me. A great thing about cycling is that everyone can do whatever the fork they want.

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Nick Payne
Joined: 10 Jan 2004
Posts: 2421
Location: Canberra, Australia

4/17/19 1:09 AM


quote:
Front derailleur unnecessary
Depends on the terrain. Half a dozen of us went on an ~80km ride yesterday along part of what's called the Centenary Trail, which follows the hills that surround Canberra on about a 25/75 mixture of unsealed bush tracks and single track. I noticed that the two riders on 1x (both quite strong) couldn't get up some of the short, rather steep hills that I could still manage on my 2x with 29t small chainring. The limiting factor on some of the steeper very rocky stuff was having the front wheel completely un-weight - things get kind of interesting when that happens over grapefruit-sized rocks. At the end of the ride my Garmin indicated a max gradient of 21% somewhere - could have been any of a number of the climbs.

I took my Open gravel bike shod with 48mm file tread tyres. It worked ok, but if I'd realized that the majority of it was single track I would have fitted knobbier tyres.

<a href='https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipO6-c_txfgmVVS7Z7vd7sgJE-NB73AdkOf00LSKxOpJooO5RaUKHywYPiODvDTFBg?key=T21zRXM0djk5aER3UXVUTWJuWDlZNHFwOW00M3Vn&source=ctrlq.org'><img src='https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/jxAXq67UuwRU0_KByUpopnlYC8A5EMAkXJVy-q6O6QSH5xzUP0OZi1vhVWPHj9HRY6wMbplnPTfHh11d74zciUmPjOjUTFUWd8DiuCbiNFnrWOAWpKmNeC1LWQRwXsIHBvu3m1QyRA=w1200' /></a>

<a href='https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipO_R_5PK-D-U7qemghzBHO_a8RwnogLGFqTaWj7ujZI78XJUrlsqIf_vfQdv1cLow?key=RTl6V2x4b1BiZFRnRnVGQTMtejR1VjRoY29UejdR&source=ctrlq.org'><img src='https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/W_4M_o8K3Dbeyz2gkFqvPSCOaEU_Sf2S6N_xC5pImEbPOI0Gu0zSsgWI_bnmVGO48fnyhzrzchwvdgBaGTc3tmwAgUcbfU2gQW2M-WBSSfM3hqO7SLUU190JJAA7rJhK8E4WESo9aw=w1200' /></a>

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17307
Location: Portland, OR

4/17/19 9:06 AM

Count on Nick for good shots! I wanna get rolling down that little hard pack path to.....

;)

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dan emery
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 6228
Location: Maine

4/17/19 4:28 PM

Front wheel lifting

An interesting topic on its own. Though Iím not sure how 1x vs 2x plays into it. I actually have a lower gear on my 1x than the 2x that got my up 27% Achambo Rd at D2R2. If the limiting factor is front wheel lifting, how does 1x vs 2x play into that? Iíll admit that you can probably get a somewhat more extreme low gear with a 2x, but that doesnít affect the wheel lifting, right?

Iíve had a couple wheel lifting experiences. At Mt Washington thereís a section of the dirt road part above tree line (ď5 mile gradeĒ) where the front wheel always lifts. I would slide my weight forward, and then the rear wheel spins. Always managed to stay up though.

The wheel also lifts on the aforementioned Achambo Rd, which is 27% rutted dirt. You are thrashing so hard just to keep going, that the airborne front wheel moves sideways in the air. So the challenge is to get the wheel down somewhere that keeps the bike moving forward. My buddy Mike was next to me and his wheel came down in a rut so he fell over. Mine came down OK, through luck rather than skill, so I got up.

Honest Mainer that he is, Mike walked down 10í before restarting so To be sure he rode the whole hill. Yes he did manage to restart.

If my wheel came down on a grapefruit sized rock Iím pretty sure Iíd be prone..:)

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Steve B.
Joined: 19 Jan 2004
Posts: 727
Location: Long Island, NY

4/18/19 12:58 PM

Not seeing where a 1X vs. 2X changes the ability to climb, IF the gearing range is essentially the same.

My Sunrace 11 spd. cassette on my mt. bike has a 19 inch low. My old 26" with a triple has a 17 inch low. If I really, really needed that 17 low (which I cannot recall using in a decade) I could go to a 12 spd. 10-50 system. At some point it's so steep I can't keep control and am walking.

I'm not commenting on the gaps an 11 or 12 spd. cassette creates, that's an issue I don't see while pure mt. biking. I could see it being annoying if I was riding easy rollers or flats on a Gravel.

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17307
Location: Portland, OR

4/18/19 3:26 PM

Steve, which Sunrace are you using?

I just popped on an 11-40 onto the TA wheel I built for the Lynskey for 700c. Only have used a 11-36 sunrace so far.
The Pro-Cx is at capacity with the 36, not too sure until I get it on there how the 40 is going work, 4 teeth over spec/capacity.

Considering I have used 4 over capacity on SS Shimano DRs, thinking it ought to work sans a Wolftooth etc. Using RD-R8000-GS. Shadow type, cage seem long!


PIE:

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Steve B.
Joined: 19 Jan 2004
Posts: 727
Location: Long Island, NY

4/18/19 3:50 PM

@Sparky,

Not certain which Sunrace model as it came supplied on the Specialized Chisel Comp I recently purchased. It's an 11-46. Not sure I've gotten up to the 46 yet in anger.

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17307
Location: Portland, OR

4/18/19 4:25 PM

I had some WTB 700x1.95 TCS Motos on the wall. For shiets and giggles I mounted one up. It actually clears the frame. And not only does the 40t work, the big big works, so no accidents there...

LOL


700c, 42mm Speedride [39mm] rear, 35 Override [36mm] front.

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dan emery
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 6228
Location: Maine

4/28/19 3:44 PM

Checkpoint 1, Pickup 0

Fun event on a mostly dirt road ride today. I turned onto a heavily potholed dirt road, and there was a pickup ahead of me proceeding very gingerly. So I did what I had to do, dusted him...:)

Continue to love this bike. My position is so good that I never take my hands off the hoods - no reason to. And the tires seem just right for what Iím doing. I think I would find closer gear gaps annoying - just more shifting up and down.

I dunno when Iíll ride my road bikes - I have lots of pretty gnarly, hilly dirt roads nearby, and theyíre so much fun on this bike thatís all Iím doing. Almost no traffic, plenty hard on the hills but no concern about how fast Iím going, fun dealing with potholes, ruts, etc., i like it.


Last edited by dan emery on 4/28/19 5:50 PM; edited 1 time in total

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 4419
Location: Nashua, NH

4/28/19 5:27 PM

"I dunno when Iíll ride my road bikes - I have lots of pretty gnarly, hilly dirt roads nearby, and theyíre so much fun on this bike thatís all Iím doing. Almost no traffic, plenty hard on the hills but no concern about how fast Iím going, fun dealing in potholes, ruts, etc., i like it."

WE TOLD YOU SO!

Welcome to the Dark Side...

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17307
Location: Portland, OR

4/28/19 5:43 PM

Better in front of the PU than behind. Dust being the key poimt. Stone dust...

Don't forget to delve into some hardpack woods single track when you get around some. My gravel bikes get as much of that as gravel. Low BB makes the difference imo.

Just getting back from MUTT ride with Elaine. She rode the paved, and I was in the gravel along side when/where ever it was there, 25% of the time. 35mm Override tubeless...

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dan emery
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 6228
Location: Maine

4/28/19 5:59 PM

Not entirely new

Iíve ridden all these roads for years, mostly on a cross bike, including with studs in winter, but I looked at it as a supplement to road riding, or prep for an event like D2R2. I find this bike just a bit better for it than the beloved Crosshairs, plus perhaps at my age (68) and after a couple of off years hammering on the road holds less appeal. Plus I have registered for D2R2 so I need to get my a$$ in shape.

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17307
Location: Portland, OR

4/28/19 8:29 PM

"Welcome to the Dark Side..."

Gravel Bike thread, 115 post in pretty short order...

Nuff said. ;)

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April
Joined: 13 Dec 2003
Posts: 6577
Location: Westchester/NYC

4/28/19 8:56 PM

Dan, which version of the frame is this? Carbon or Al?

I was at the Trek shop yesterday to help a friend pick up her Checkpoint 3, an Al frame. Got me itchy on getting a new one for myself...

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dan emery
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 6228
Location: Maine

4/29/19 4:39 AM

@April

April, the frame is carbon. The bike is a 5 with a SRAM Force 1x11 group swapped in.

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17307
Location: Portland, OR

4/29/19 8:44 AM

Just a thought/consideration. One of the beauties of bikes that fit 40mm tires that you run @ 35 PSI is that you really don't get the Aluminum frame buzz you do with a 25mm tire.

The Aluminum Reline Conquest with the tubeless 42mm feels the same as the Ti Lynsky on rough pavement and broken surfaces as it pertains to feel/buzz really. This did not stop me from replacing the AL frame bike with the Ti one.

Just preference for cost due to the stupid Lynskey sale of a $3500 MSRP frame for $1250.00.

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dfcas
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 2602
Location: hillbilly heaven

4/29/19 2:25 PM

Ok so does anybody know why fat bike riders buy ti and carbon frames, both rigid and suspended, that use 4 inch tires at 6 psi? Aluminum makes the most sense to me.

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17307
Location: Portland, OR

4/29/19 3:23 PM

Same reason I buy Ti. Because it is Ti..

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dfcas
Joined: 11 Jan 2004
Posts: 2602
Location: hillbilly heaven

4/29/19 4:10 PM

Ya but you might conceivably run narrowiish tires on your frame that then makes the frame material affect ride characteristics I canít see that need on a fat.

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Sparky
Joined: 08 Dec 2003
Posts: 17307
Location: Portland, OR

4/29/19 5:45 PM

Zoot then??

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Brian Nystrom
Joined: 26 Jan 2004
Posts: 4419
Location: Nashua, NH

4/29/19 6:01 PM

Perhaps it's because Ti frames are "forever". Al will eventually fatigue and fail, even on a fat bike, which really isn't significantly different in terms of frame stresses from a full-suspension MTB.

As for carbon, it saves considerable weight on a fat bike, although carbon rims make more difference than a carbon frame. Fat bikes need all the help they can get in that regard.

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